Creating Close Tolerance Curved Steel Tees

Steel tees, especially larger tees, are produced by splitting a steel beam and then straightening or curving the two resultant tees to the required specifications. At times these specifications can require close tolerance work.
For example, WT12 x 27.5 steel tees were required to be rolled stem-out to an inside radius of 53ft 0.187in with 44ft 4in . . . → Read More: Creating Close Tolerance Curved Steel Tees

Creating Straight or Curved Steel Tees

One of the structural steel shapes is the tee.  Tees can be supplied straight or curved.  The smaller sizes are produced in steel mills; the larger sizes are produced by splitting beams longitudinally.

A customer who is seeking steel tees for use in machinery and equipment or for use in construction would typically contact either a steel . . . → Read More: Creating Straight or Curved Steel Tees

Built-up Curved Tees

Steel tees up to 22 x 142-1/2 can be curved stem in, stem out or stem up.  At times, however, either the stem is too large or the radius is too tight to roll a tee.  One solution is to fabricate a built-up tee.

For example, a customer wanted two tees with a 14in stem ½ in . . . → Read More: Built-up Curved Tees

Straightening or Curving Steel Tees Made from Split Beams

20ft WT4 x 9 Split and Straightened to 1/16in Tolerance

One steel section that does not typically come as a profile from a steel mill is the tee section.  Except for small sections, steel tees are produced by splitting beams.  A rotary shear or a torch cuts the web of the beam to produce . . . → Read More: Straightening or Curving Steel Tees Made from Split Beams

Bending Steel Tees from ¾ Inch to WT18

Several steel mills produce small structural steel tees in sizes from ¾” to 2-1/2” which can be purchased at many steel warehouses. Tees can be rolled stem-in, stem-out or stem-up. Larger size tees are made by splitting a structural beam, either by flame cutting or by rotary shear. (A machine that looks like an oversized can . . . → Read More: Bending Steel Tees from ¾ Inch to WT18

Can a curved steel section reduce the cost of OEM products?

(Can a woodchuck chuck wood?)

While attending various trade shows either for OEM products like storage tanks, antennas, agricultural and construction equipment, etc.,  I regularly see where the use of a curved steel section—produced by beam bending, bar bending, angle bending, channel bending or any other section bending—could have reduced the cost of the equipment.

For example, I . . . → Read More: Can a curved steel section reduce the cost of OEM products?

Curved Steel in Construction? No worries!

Whenever I talk to architects and engineers about bending beams, bending pipes, or any other steel section bending, three questions usually come up:

Is it structurally sound?
Is it too expensive? And
Is it readily available to meet a demanding construction schedule.

Is it structurally sound?

Writing specifically about steel beam bending, Reidar Bjorhovde addressed this question in the  Engineering Journal/Fourth . . . → Read More: Curved Steel in Construction? No worries!

Galvanizing Curved Steel

Recently, I gave the presentation at the Kansas City Regional Steel Fabricators Association biannual meeting. 110 steel fabricators, engineers, architects, detailers, and others attended the breakfast.

I talked about the benefits of involving a specialty subcontractor like Chicago Metal Rolled Products in the design process when curved steel elements are included like rolled HSS and W beams.

During . . . → Read More: Galvanizing Curved Steel