Non-Commodity Steel Channels Through Forming/Bending

The term “non-commodity” is used to describe steel shapes when the size and alloy in demand is not produced for distribution to the masses. The demand for these specialty steel members does not occur with enough frequency for rolling mills and reduction mills to consider this type of work. So, specialty steel fabricators with bender/roller capabilities . . . → Read More: Non-Commodity Steel Channels Through Forming/Bending

Curved Steel Channel for the Vets

Representative of the Elks USA located in Chicago via e-mail:  “Can you supply two 40in diameter rings of 3in channel in stainless steel rolled with the flanges out for the reconstruction of our flagpole base?”

Elks' Flagpole Base in Disrepair

Rusted Base of the Flagpole

Estimator of the Bender Roller Company:  “Here is the quotation for the . . . → Read More: Curved Steel Channel for the Vets

Curving Formed Steel Channels

Of all the structural steel sections that are curved in a variety of ways, one of the most difficult to curve is the steel channel rolled against the strong axis.

Sketch of Structural Channel Rolled the "Hard Way"

When bending a channel the “hard way” in a three-roll bender, the section tends to distort in a number . . . → Read More: Curving Formed Steel Channels

The Challenges of Rolling Formed, Metal Channels

Of all the structural shapes – angles, bars, beams, channels, tees, pipe and tube – everything else being equal, the most difficult shape to bend is channel the “hard way,” i.e. against the strong axis.  As you can imagine, pressing against the flanges to curve the metal shape is likely to push them inward, especially at . . . → Read More: The Challenges of Rolling Formed, Metal Channels

Rotary Channel Splitter

A rotary channel splitter is a device that cuts with revolving steel wheels.  A blade that is stationary rotates to push the channel against another blade that causes the material to experience highly localized shear stresses between the two blades.  In a rotary shear process, materials are cut in the pinch between two overlapping hardened metal . . . → Read More: Rotary Channel Splitter

Aluminum Channel Bent to Represent a Double Helix DNA Model

Bending aluminum channel can be difficult.  Under extreme conditions, it tends to crack.  Bending aluminum channel into a helix is even more of a challenge.  With the right tooling, machine, machine operator and process, however, some impressive bends can be achieved.

The new Manning Family Science Building, designed by architects Bartzen & Ball, recently went up at . . . → Read More: Aluminum Channel Bent to Represent a Double Helix DNA Model

Curved Steel Beams and Channels Used as Walers

Steel beams and channels rolled into a circle and installed horizontally are often used to reinforce soil in trenches.  These rings are called walers.  Typically, steel sheet piling is driven into the ground behind the walers.  This creates a ring template used to protect workers and to allow construction equipment access to an excavated area.

Excavating and pile-driving . . . → Read More: Curved Steel Beams and Channels Used as Walers

Alternatives to a Mandrel Bend of a Large Channel to a Minimum Bending Radius.

When one considers ways to bend a large channel flanges-out to a minimum bending radius, doing a mandrel bend is one alternative.  A recent requirement was for more than 200 rolled channel, bump protectors to cover cement columns in an airport.  The design called for MC12 x 10.6 curved to a very tight 12-1/2 inch inside . . . → Read More: Alternatives to a Mandrel Bend of a Large Channel to a Minimum Bending Radius.

Dialogues About Beam Bending, Channel Bending and Tube Bending

Specialty subcontractors who curve steel often enter into a dialogue with their customers about beam bending, channel bending and tube bending.  The results of these discussions can determine which steel sections to use in a project and what the costs might be. And the earlier that these conversations take place between the specialty subcontractor, the structural . . . → Read More: Dialogues About Beam Bending, Channel Bending and Tube Bending

Steel Channel Bending for Exhaust Elbows: We’ve Been Working on the Railroad Engines

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Can’t bend a tube?  Bend two channels—one flanges in, one flanges out—and then weld them together to create a curved tube.  No channels in the desired size?  Form two steel plates into channels, bend them and then weld them together.  Such steel channel bending solved the challenge of providing exhaust elbows for locomotives bound for Saudi . . . → Read More: Steel Channel Bending for Exhaust Elbows: We’ve Been Working on the Railroad Engines